OCCUPATION THESAURUS

MODEL



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HELPFUL TIP:

How your character makes a living is an important decision. After all, there’s probably a good reason why they chose this career. Think about how they pull on certain talents and skills, have positive or negative traits, and adhere to a specific work ethic to excel. Sometimes characters choose an occupation because of how they were raised, something they experienced, or even an emotional wound, so consider how all of these things will show readers who they are deep down, and why they do what they do.
OVERVIEW:
The career of a model can look very different depending on the type of modeling they do and the level of their success. Most modeling falls into two categories: editorial (magazine spreads in higher-end magazines, fashion catwalks, high-end makeup ads, etc.) and commercial (catalogs, print ads for non-fashion products, commercials, and even showroom work where they work with the fashion designers as a form for the clothing being made). Models who are editorial often have a very distinctive look (something different or striking) and are often quite tall and adhere to very specific weight and age ranges. They also will clearly display their personality to prospective agents and clients in their look, but are expected to be flexible and opinionated. Those in commercial modeling may have a variety of sizes and heights, be of different ages, and would have more of a “girl (or boy) next door” appeal because commercial modeling is more about the product than the model.

Most models do not make a living wage and only model part time or have another job to supplement their income. The hours are very long and demanding, and it isn’t uncommon for an editorial model to be paid for their time with a lunch or a gift of clothing rather than a cash payment if they are in the building stages of their career where they are striving to build a portfolio and gain recognition. Those who are at the top of the editorial modeling world can make millions, but this is the exception, not the rule. Commercial modeling can be more lucrative including residuals from commercials, but neither avenue comes with job security or medical benefits unless the model is in high demand. The competition is very high and the industry is saturated with criticism and rejection, so having a strong mindset and being determined is crucial.

Typically modeling starts in the teens and goes into the early twenties in editorial modeling, but a greater range is common in commercial because it is more about what a specific brand is looking for as a match for their product, catalog, or commercial. Models may also only use one of their features, such as a hand (jewelry, skincare products, accessories) or foot (shoes, socks, accessories) rather than their whole body.
Much of a model’s time is spent off-camera waiting for interviews, going to castings or auditions, fittings, spending time in hair and makeup, going to the gym, and rushing between appointments. Because the industry has a huge power imbalance, there is a lot of additional pressure on models. Some may deal with inappropriate touching, sexual advances, and pressure to have sex. Because modeling can look very different depending on the type of work being done and the success level of the model it’s important to do your research for this type of character.

NECESSARY TRAINING:
Models may take classes to become more comfortable with the business (understanding how casting and callbacks work, fittings, dealing with criticism, the role of agents, the importance of building a name, how to create a strong portfolio, working with photographers, etc.), but it isn’t a requirement. Maintaining strong hygiene, maintaining good health, and controlling one’s weight are all key for this profession.

USEFUL SKILLS, TALENTS, OR ABILITIES:

HELPFUL POSITIVE TRAITS:
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HELPFUL NEGATIVE TRAITS:
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EMOTIONAL WOUNDS THAT MAY HAVE FACTORED INTO THIS OCCUPATION CHOICE:
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SOURCES OF FRICTION:
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PEOPLE THEY MIGHT INTERACT WITH:
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HOW THIS OCCUPATION MIGHT IMPACT ONE'S BASIC NEEDS:
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TWISTING THE STEREOTYPE:
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REASONS THE CHARACTER MAY HAVE BEEN DRAWN TO THIS PROFESSION:
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