OCCUPATION THESAURUS

PAROLE OFFICER



Never struggle with Show-and-Tell again. Sign up and activate your free trial, Sign in as a subscriber to view the Occupation Thesaurus in its entirety, or visit the Table of Contents to explore unlocked entries.

START MY 2-WEEK FREE TRIAL

HELPFUL TIP:

How your character makes a living is an important decision. After all, there’s probably a good reason why they chose this career. Think about how they pull on certain talents and skills, have positive or negative traits, and adhere to a specific work ethic to excel. Sometimes characters choose an occupation because of how they were raised, something they experienced, or even an emotional wound, so consider how all of these things will show readers who they are deep down, and why they do what they do.
OVERVIEW:
When an offender is released from prison but is still on probation, a parole officer monitors them, ensuring they have registered with the local police, undergo drug testing, report to an officer at appointed times, and follow all restrictions and conditions of their parole. Parole officers explain all the conditions of parole, the rules clients must follow, and will also make sure offenders are enrolled in rehabilitation and job training programs as determined by the court. (A parole officer is slightly different than a probation officer, who monitors those who have been sentenced to serve probation rather than a jail sentence.)

Parole officers handle a large caseload and keep detailed records on each client (where they live, friends and family contacts, employment records, and the parolee's progress). They will make planned visits to the home of the parolee, talk to family members, neighbors, coworkers, employers, and if applicable, will use community associations and religious groups the offender may be affiliated with to check on the offender's behavior and ensure they are following all conditions of their parole. Ultimately, they decide if an offender is rehabilitated and integrating back into society appropriately or if they need to be returned to jail.

A parole officer's work is challenging as they are required to work a variety of hours (some in an office setting, some in the field, often in higher crime locations) and talk to people who are resistant to working with anyone in the justice system.

NECESSARY TRAINING:
Generally, characters in this field have a bachelor's degree and have completed a program in criminal justice, social work, and/or psychology. They may be required to take a state-sponsored training program, and a certification test. They're often are required to be certified to use a firearm, must pass background checks, and be trained to perform drug tests. Parole officers should be astute at understanding body language and behavior and be excellent communicators.

USEFUL SKILLS, TALENTS, OR ABILITIES:

HELPFUL POSITIVE TRAITS:
...

HELPFUL NEGATIVE TRAITS:
...

EMOTIONAL WOUNDS THAT MAY HAVE FACTORED INTO THIS OCCUPATION CHOICE:
...

SOURCES OF FRICTION:
...

PEOPLE THEY MIGHT INTERACT WITH:
...

HOW THIS OCCUPATION MIGHT IMPACT ONE'S BASIC NEEDS:
...

...

REASONS THE CHARACTER MAY HAVE BEEN DRAWN TO THIS PROFESSION:
...