OCCUPATION THESAURUS

MILITARY OFFICER



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HELPFUL TIP:

How your character makes a living is an important decision. After all, there’s probably a good reason why they chose this career. Think about how they pull on certain talents and skills, have positive or negative traits, and adhere to a specific work ethic to excel. Sometimes characters choose an occupation because of how they were raised, something they experienced, or even an emotional wound, so consider how all of these things will show readers who they are deep down, and why they do what they do.
OVERVIEW:
A military officer is a member of a country's military forces who holds a position of authority. Their duties require them to oversee personnel units and may include planning missions, leading troops on those missions, managing subordinates, attending meetings, preparing training exercises, conducting safety drills, maintaining equipment, and filing significant paperwork. Military forces vary depending on the nation, but may include Air Force, Army/Land Forces, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, or Navy. Official positions include non-commissioned officers, commissioned officers, and warrant officers.

NECESSARY TRAINING:
Non-commissioned officers (NCOs) attend basic training to prepare physically, mentally, and emotionally for military life. Afterward, they receive education in leadership and their military trade specialty.

Commissioned officers outrank all enlisted personnel and NCOs. They generally enter the military with a four-year college degree (though not all countries require one) and are commissioned in various ways. These include but are not limited to service academies or senior military colleges, Reserve Officer Training Corp (ROTC) programs through traditional colleges, Officer Candidate School, direct commissioning after college graduation, and programs that transition non-commissioned officers to commissioned ones.

Warrant officers are considered subject matter experts in specific technical areas. Their rank falls below the lowest commissioned officer but above the highest non-commissioned officer.

Additional training for the military officer is conducted over the entire span of their career though professional military education (PME). From Officer Basic to the War College, each grade of officer has a training course that must be attended to prepare them for leading at the next level.

USEFUL SKILLS, TALENTS, OR ABILITIES:

HELPFUL POSITIVE TRAITS:
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HELPFUL NEGATIVE TRAITS:
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EMOTIONAL WOUNDS THAT MAY HAVE FACTORED INTO THIS OCCUPATION CHOICE:
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SOURCES OF FRICTION:
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PEOPLE THEY MIGHT INTERACT WITH:
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HOW THIS OCCUPATION MIGHT IMPACT ONE'S BASIC NEEDS:
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COMMON WORK-RELATED SETTINGS:
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TWISTING THE STEREOTYPE:
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REASONS THE CHARACTER MAY HAVE BEEN DRAWN TO THIS PROFESSION:
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