OCCUPATION THESAURUS

INTERPRETER



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HELPFUL TIP:

How your character makes a living is an important decision. After all, there’s probably a good reason why they chose this career. Think about how they pull on certain talents and skills, have positive or negative traits, and adhere to a specific work ethic to excel. Sometimes characters choose an occupation because of how they were raised, something they experienced, or even an emotional wound, so consider how all of these things will show readers who they are deep down, and why they do what they do.
OVERVIEW:
An interpreter is someone who orally or through sign language translates one person’s words into a different language. This is different from a translator who does essentially the same thing but with words in a written format, such as in books or documents. Interpreters work most often in hospitals, schools, and courtrooms, but they also can work at conferences, in political arenas, with the police when language barriers are preventing communication, and other situations. They may work with an interpreter company or do freelance work. On long or challenging jobs, they can work in teams as a way of combating mental fatigue. They can work on-site or offer their services remotely, even from home.

NECESSARY TRAINING:
Most interpreters need a bachelor’s degree and all of them must be proficient in at least two languages. While further language training isn’t required, the more experience one has with a given language, the better; so having spent time immersed in the language and culture may give someone a leg up of the competition. Those working in certain fields, such as the medical field or courtroom, may need technical training in that area to bring them up to speed.

USEFUL SKILLS, TALENTS, OR ABILITIES:

HELPFUL POSITIVE TRAITS:
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HELPFUL NEGATIVE TRAITS:
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EMOTIONAL WOUNDS THAT MAY HAVE FACTORED INTO THIS OCCUPATION CHOICE:
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SOURCES OF FRICTION:
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PEOPLE THEY MIGHT INTERACT WITH:
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HOW THIS OCCUPATION MIGHT IMPACT ONE'S BASIC NEEDS:
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COMMON WORK-RELATED SETTINGS:
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REASONS THE CHARACTER MAY HAVE BEEN DRAWN TO THIS PROFESSION:
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