WEATHER AND EARTHLY PHENOMENON THESAURUS

ECLIPSE



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HELPFUL TIP:

Don’t be afraid to pair weather conditions with your setting choice to contrast or reinforce a character’s emotions. Hopelessness might be mirrored in the relentless drizzle of rain and the resulting heavy drag of one’s clothes; alternatively, this feeling can stand out in stark contrast to sunlight dancing over fresh snow. Can weather also provide symbolism, thereby enriching the reader’s experience? Think about your goal for the scene and the mood you are trying to create, and then layer your description with meaningful choices.
SIGHTS:
Lunar Eclipses: 
    Whenever there is light, objects—even planets—cast a shadow. In the Earth's case, its shadow falls across the surface of the moon, turning part of it dark, which we see visibly as the moon cycles through different phases (full, waxing, waning, new moon, etc.). During orbit, when there is a perfect alignment between the sun, Earth, and moon (with the earth at the center), a lunar eclipse occurs. The appearance of the moon can vary from completely dark to slightly reddish, depending on which part of the Earth’s shadow (the darker middle part or the lighter outer part) the moon is traveling through. When cast in red, the moon is sometimes referred to as a blood moon. Eclipses where the moon is made nearly invisible are called total eclipses. Lunar eclipses vary in length but usually last at least a few hours and are visible anywhere it is night.

Solar Eclipses:
    A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the Earth and sun, and the moon’s shadow falls over the Earth’s surface. Depending on the alignment, the eclipse may be total or partial. A total eclipse happens when a new moon is positioned directly between the Earth and the sun. These conditions occur about every year and a half and cause the moon to block out the sun completely. But the effect is only visible from a small portion of the Earth’s surface (a strip only one hundred and fifty kilometers wide). From the areas outside of this strip, only a partial eclipse is seen as the sun is only partially covered by the moon. This is why witnessing a total solar eclipse is a special event.
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TEXTURES AND SENSATIONS:
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SOUNDS:
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REINFORCING A MOOD:
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SYMBOLISM:
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COMMON CLICHÉS:
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WEATHER NOTES:
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SCENARIOS FOR ADDING CONFLICT OR TENSION:
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