WEATHER AND EARTHLY PHENOMENON THESAURUS

BREEZE



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HELPFUL TIP:

Don’t be afraid to pair weather conditions with your setting choice to contrast or reinforce a character’s emotions. Hopelessness might be mirrored in the relentless drizzle of rain and the resulting heavy drag of one’s clothes; alternatively, this feeling can stand out in stark contrast to sunlight dancing over fresh snow. Can weather also provide symbolism, thereby enriching the reader’s experience? Think about your goal for the scene and the mood you are trying to create, and then layer your description with meaningful choices.
SIGHTS:
A breeze bestows the impression of fluid movement on any lightweight freestanding object. Fabrics—skirts, flags, or tablecloths at a patio bistro—will ripple or billow in a breeze. Leaves shift, hair lifts away from the face, and grasses bend and rustle. A breeze can carry items (such as dirt, dust particles, and dandelion fluff) while also moving trash or dead leaves lying on the ground.

SMELLS:
Breezes hold the scents of items in their surrounding environments. The breeze near a beach might carry a briny smell along with coconut-scented suntan lotion and food odors from nearby vendors (hot dogs, burgers, deep fry oil, etc.). In an urban area, a breeze might smell of motor oil, car exhaust, hot asphalt, or metal. In the woods, pine needles, earthy soil, greenery, and fragrant wildflowers would be highly noticeable.

TEXTURES AND SENSATIONS:
Breezes can be warm or cool and are often pleasant because of the immediate sensory input that is generated when they touch the skin. One's skin may prickle if the breeze is too cool, hair can blow across the eyes and need to be tucked back, and clothing might flutter against the body. People often will turn to face a breeze so they can feel the press of air against them. A breeze can also dry the eyes, resulting in the need to squint or blink more frequently.

SOUNDS:
Rustling grass and leaves
Fluttering fabric (clothing, a curtain in an open window, etc.)
Dry leaves and paper ticking or scraping along the ground
A creaking gate or door
Distant voices 

REINFORCING A MOOD:
A breeze can lighten the mood of those within the setting....

SYMBOLISM:
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COMMON CLICHÉS:
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WEATHER NOTES:
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SCENARIOS FOR ADDING CONFLICT OR TENSION:
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