SYMBOLISM AND MOTIF THESAURUS

HOPE



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HELPFUL TIP:

Symbolism is something that many readers recognize on either a conscious or subconscious level; including it adds a layer of richness to the story. Think about how you can add specific motifs or symbols to your setting that will reinforce the symbolism you are trying to convey. Additionally, symbols woven into the description of your scene can help reinforce your character's emotions and mood. In this way, you’ll be able to do more with less.
IN NATURE:
The sun emerging from behind a cloud
The warmth of sunshine
Rain falling on dry ground
The smell of rain or moisture in the air
Sunrise
New growth
Changing seasons
Spring
Seagull sightings in the middle of the ocean
The sight of land as seen from the sea
Rainbows
Babies and offspring in the animal kingdom
The first flowers in spring (daffodils, tulips, crocuses, snowdrops)
Melting snow
The new moon
The horizon
Butterflies

IN SOCIETY:
Children
Newborns
Schools and youth centers
A pink cancer ribbon
Random acts of kindness
Open doors
A light turning on in the dark
The Statue of Liberty
Soup kitchens
An anchor
Pandora's Box
Religious symbols
Places of worship (churches, synogogues, mosques, shrines)
Education
Amethysts
Medicines and vaccines
Experimental treatments and drug trials
Advances in science
The comforting arms of a loved one
Second chances
New beginnings (a new job, school, house, or look)
New Year's Day
The delta symbol (signifying change)
Historical figures who brought hope to others (Martin Luther King, Jr., Mother Theresa, William Wallace)

EXAMPLE(S) FROM LITERATURE:
The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald): the green light on Daisy's dock
The Giver (Lois Lowry): Gabriel
Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption (Stephen King): pinup posters

SEE ALSO: