EMOTION AMPLIFIER THESAURUS

INEBRIATION



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HELPFUL TIP:

Amplifiers are conditions that enhance emotions, causing characters to become more volatile. This often leads to impaired decision-making, hasty actions and, best of all, mistakes. When utilizing an amplifier to generate conflict, think carefully about setting choices and which environments will naturally escalate emotion. An amplifier can also be perfect for triggering your character’s negative traits; the resulting fallout will draw attention to how his flaws trip him up and hold him back.
DEFINITION:
Intoxication; a state of exhilaration or stupefaction, usually caused by alcohol

PHYSICAL SIGNALS AND BEHAVIORS:
A weaving walk
A slurred voice
Giggling, excessive laughter
Waving the arms in slow motion
Poor hand-eye coordination
Poor depth perception (stumbling over obstacles, missing a chair when sitting)
Excessive dancing or celebrating
Hooting, yelling, shouting, and swearing
Speaking unfiltered thoughts
Overreacting
Misjudging the emotions of others
Falling into people, crashing into objects
Holding onto the wall when walking
Using shuffling steps
A lurching walk or run
Hunching over
Leaning too closely to people
Increased touches through movement and gesturing
A relaxed posture
Spilling food or drinks
Slowly tilting the head
Sloppy eating
Closing one’s eyes
Shifting the body back and forth to find balance
Leaning, standing, or sitting at an angle
Sweating
Talking too loudly
Glittering or glowing eyes
Slowed reflexes
Blinking rapidly to focus on something
Beer breath
Easy camaraderie (hugging, touching), even with strangers
Talking too much or interrupting others
Pulling pranks or committing petty crimes for fun

INTERNAL SENSATIONS:
Tunnel vision
Nausea
Feeling like the room is spinning
A tingling or fuzzy feeling in the body

MENTAL RESPONSES:
A desire to socialize, talk with, and interact with others
A decreased sense of personal space
Taking risks
Poor judgment
A sense of courage; feeling the need to act
Losing track of time
Increased aggression
Missing or misinterpreting negative body language cues
Slowed reactions and responses
A loss of inhibitions
Increased sense of kinship and affection: I love you, man!
Immunity to embarrassment
Believing that one is more suave, charming, or intelligent than one really is
Assuming that everyone else is just as inebriated

CUES OF ACUTE OR LONG TERM INEBRIATION:
Collapsing
Yawning, falling asleep, passing out
Vomiting
Blackouts
Alcohol poisoning
Loss of bladder control

CUES OF SUPPRESSED INEBRIATION:
Insisting that one is sober or fine
Attempting to prove soberness (walking a line, touching the nose)
Forcing eyes as wide as they’ll go
Deflecting: He’s way more drunk than me
Avoiding eye contact

WRITERS TIP:
Depending on how quickly the liver metabolizes alcohol, inebriation symptoms will vary from person to person. Weight, body chemistry, and genetics are also factors in how well the body tolerates liquor. Because alcohol has an affinity for water, people with more fat tissue often take longer to reach peak BAC (Blood Alcohol Content).

ASSOCIATED POWER VERBS:
Weave, slip, lurch, jerk, smirk, smile, flirt, swill, gulp, slug, toss, slurp, sip, stumble, point, gesture, slur, mumble, ramble, wave, hug, touch, laugh, joke, shout, grin, snort, lean, pass out

SCENARIOS FOR BUILDING CONFLICT AND TENSION:
Accidentally sharing someone else’s secret when one’s inhibitions are lowered
Flirting with strangers or co-workers when one’s partner is around
Oversharing intimate details about one’s life or past
Offering one’s honest thoughts, unfiltered, in a way that impacts relationships (good or bad)